When Editing Photos It's Best To Use A Light Touch

Usually, I'm an advocate for editing your photos as it's very rare that a photo couldn't benefit from a bit of polishing. But once in a while, we all need to be reminded that it's best to use a light touch when editing. Ideally, you want to get as close to the final result, in-camera, as you possible can. A few tweaks here and there and you're done.

Of course there can be edits that require a little more, touch-ups, selections, etc... and here a light touch is best as well. Much of this is subjective and comes down to taste - but it's also a skill that improves with practice.

That's why, when the pros start to screw up (Annie Leibovitz - no less) it makes news. Last week's issue of Vanity Fair's cover photo (and some behind-the-scenes photos) apparently showed Oprah Winfrey and Reese Witherspoon with 3-hands and 3 legs, respectively.

So treat is as a reminder to use a deft touch when editing photos. Nobody wants to see how the sausages are made.

Feature Photograph of the Week - Up The Yangtze

   
  
   
  
    
  
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  Sailing on the Yangtze River in China’s Hubei province.

Sailing on the Yangtze River in China’s Hubei province.